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Chronic Pain

A lot of people have chronic pain and think that they don’t. They say things like: “It comes and it goes, but it’s not chronic.” Or: “No, it’s not chronic. I only feel it when it’s about to rain, or when I climb stairs.”

The word chronic, like chronicle and chronology, comes from khronos, Greek for ‘time’. Chronic does not mean ‘continuous’ or ‘unrelenting’. Chronic pain usually comes and goes. Chronic does not mean intense. Chronic pain can be mild, moderate or severe. If you experience pain in any part of your body, that lasts––continuously or intermittently––for more than a few days or weeks, you have chronic pain. If the pain goes away for months or years, then comes back, to the same part of your body––even if it feels different, i.e. more or less intense, more or less localized, even ‘like nothing you’ve ever felt before’––if it’s in the same part of your body, it’s chronic. This means that however irregular, infrequent, or situation dependent your pain is, the cause is probably the same. And that cause is probably always there, even when you feel perfectly fine.

Dr. Binkley can identify the underlying causes of nearly anything ails you, and offer solutions that give both quick relief, and lasting results.

QUESTIONS ARE WELCOMED AND ENCOURAGED!

Email Dr. Binkley:
[email protected]

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